Traumatic brain injuries will change the way a person lives, at least in the short term. For the majority of people who suffer moderate to severe brain injuries, there is a likelihood that they will always have some form of disability or symptom of the original injury.

Brain injuries are very common, with over 200,000 people suffering from them each year in the United States. To test for one, a patient needs to go to a hospital and have an X-ray, MRI, CT scan or other imaging performed.

How can you tell if you have a brain injury after a collision?

There is no way to know for certain, but there are some symptoms that could be a sign of a traumatic injury, such as:

  • A loss of consciousness
  • A headache
  • Fatigue
  • Drowsiness
  • Confusion
  • Disorientation

If you have any of these symptoms, it’s important to seek out help for your potential brain injury right away.

Keep in mind that not all brain injuries are apparent as soon as they happen. Many develop over time. For example, a slow bleed on the brain may not put enough pressure on the brain to cause symptoms for several hours or days. At that point, the condition could be life-threatening.

After a crash, it’s vital that you and your loved ones go to the hospital, even if you think you’ve escaped without injuries. Some hidden injuries can be devastating if left without treatment. Our site has more on what you need to do if you’re in a crash and believe that you have suffered a brain injury.  Contact the Law Offices of John W. Merting for a free consultation to learn what your rights are and determine if we can assist you.